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  • Billions of Dollars, Monthly, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate

    View data of PCE, an index that measures monthly changes in the price of consumer goods and services as a means of analyzing inflation.

  • Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B652RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B642RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B652RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B690RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B691RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B698RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B697RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B642RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B690RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B691RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B697RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    BEA Account Code: B698RG For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

  • Billions of Dollars, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate

    View data of PCE, an index that measures monthly changes in the price of consumer goods and services as a means of analyzing inflation.

  • Billions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    View data of PCE, an index that measures monthly changes in the price of consumer goods and services as a means of analyzing inflation.

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252883100

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252882800

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252884300

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0254871200

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0254871300

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252885800

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252886100

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252882200

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252885500

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252881900

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0254871100

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252885200

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252883700

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252883400

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252884900

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252884000

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252882500

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252881600

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LEU0252884600

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LES1252881900

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LES1252882800

  • 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

    Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses. Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. Visit the BLS (https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm) for more information. The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)' The source code is: LES1252881600

  • Millions of 1982-84 CPI Adjusted Dollars, Monthly, Seasonally Adjusted

    This series is constructed as Advance Retail and Food Services Sales (https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/RSAFS) deflated using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (1982-84=100) (https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/CPIAUCSL).

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Communications (08)" is a classification of services. The category, Communications (07), contains Postal Services (08.1), and Telephone and Telefax Equipment (08.2), and Telephone and Telefax Services (08.3) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages (01)" is a classification of nondurable goods. This classification contains the Food (01.1) and Non-Alcoholic Beverages (01.2) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Alcoholic Beverages, Tobacco, and Narcotics (02)" is a classification of nondurable goods. This classification contains the Alcoholic Beverages (02.1) and Tobacco (02.2) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Clothing and Footwear (03)" is a classification of semi-durable goods and services. This classification contains the Clothing (03.1) and Footwear (03.2) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas, and Other Fuels (04)"; is a classification of nondurable goods, services, and energy. The category; Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas, and Other Fuels (04); contains Actual Rentals for Housing (04.1), Maintenance and Repair of the Dwelling (04.3), Water Supply and Miscellaneous Services Relating to the Dwelling (04.4), and Electricity, Gas, and Other Fuels (04.5) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Transport (07)" is a classification of durable goods, nondurable goods, semi-durable goods, services, and energy. This category contains Purchase of Vehicles (07.1), Operation of Personal Transport Equipment (07.2), and Transport Services (07.3) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Recreation and Culture (09)" is a classification of durable goods, nondurable goods, semi-durable goods, and services. This category contains Audio-Visual, Photographic, and Information Processing Equipment (09.1), Other Major Durables for Recreation and Culture (09.2), Other Recreational Items and Equipment, Gardens and Pets (09.3), Recreational and Cultural Services (09.4), Newspapers, Books, and Stationery (09.5), and Package Holidays (09.6), categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Miscellaneous Goods and Services (12)" is a classification of semi-durable goods, nondurable goods, durable goods, and services. This category contains Personal Care (12.1), Personal Effects, Not Elsewhere Classified (12.3), Social Protection (12.4), Insurance (12.5), Financial Services, Not Elsewhere Classified (12.6), and Other Services, Not Elsewhere Classified (12.7) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Education (10)" is a classification of services that includes educational services; education by radio or television broadcasting; literacy programs for students too old for primary school; out-of-school secondary education for adults and young people; out-of-school post-secondary non-tertiary education for adults and young people; and educational programs, generally for adults, which do not require any special prior instruction, in particular vocational training and cultural development. Education (10) excludes expenditures on educational materials, such as books (09.5.1) and stationery (09.5.4), or education support services, such as health care services (06), transport services (07.3), catering services (11.1.2), accommodation services (11.2.0), driving lessons (07.2.4), and recreational training courses such as sport or bridge lessons given by independent teachers (09.4.1). The breakdown of educational services is based upon the level categories of the 1997 International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED-97) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). This covers COICOP groups 10.1/2/3/4. Levels 0 and 1 of ISCED-97 are pre-primary and primary education. Levels 2 and 3 of ISCED-97 are lower-secondary and upper-secondary education. Level 4 of ISCED-97 are post-secondary non-tertiary education. Levels 5 and 6 of ISCED-97 are first stage and second stage of tertiary education. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Furnishings, Household Equipment, and Routine Maintenance of the House (05)" is a classification of durable goods, nondurable goods, semi-durable goods, and services. This category contains Furniture and Furnishings, Carpets, and Other Floor Coverings (05.1), Household Textiles (05.2), Household Appliances (05.3), Glassware, Tableware, and Household Utensils (05.4), Tools and Equipment for House and Garden (05.5), and Goods and Services for Routine Household Maintenance (05.6) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices category "Health (06)" is a classification of nondurable goods and services that include health services purchased from school and university health centers. This category contains the subcategories of Medical Products, Appliances, and Equipment (06.1), Out-Patient Services (06.2), and Hospital Services (06.3) categories and all subcategories therein. Information provided in the notes pertaining to HICP classifications can be found from the source at: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/prc_hicp_esms.htm. Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.

  • Index 2015=100, Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Copyright, European Union, 1995-2016, http://ec.europa.eu/geninfo/legal_notices_en.htm#copyright.


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