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  • Billions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This account is the primary operational account of the U.S. Treasury at the Federal Reserve. Virtually all U.S. government disbursements are made from this account. Some tax receipts, primarily individual and other tax payments made directly to the Treasury, are deposited in this account, and it is also used to collect funds from sales of Treasury debt.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This account is the primary operational account of the U.S. Treasury at the Federal Reserve. Virtually all U.S. government disbursements are made from this account. Some tax receipts, primarily individual and other tax payments made directly to the Treasury, are deposited in this account, and it is also used to collect funds from sales of Treasury debt.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to a set of counterparties under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements may be conducted with foreign official and international accounts as a service to the holders of these accounts. All other reverse repurchase agreements, including transactions with primary dealers and a set of eligible money market funds, are open market operations intended to manage the supply of reserve balances; reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the counterparties' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the counterparties.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to a set of counterparties under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements may be conducted with foreign official and international accounts as a service to the holders of these accounts. All other reverse repurchase agreements, including transactions with primary dealers and a set of eligible money market funds, are open market operations intended to manage the supply of reserve balances; reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the counterparties' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the counterparties.

  • Billions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Feb 1984 - Dec 1990: Annual Statistical Digest, various issues, Table 2. Jan 1991 to date: Federal Reserve Board, H.4.1. Reserve balances with Federal Reserve Banks are the difference between "total factors supplying reserve funds" and "total factors, other than reserve balances, absorbing reserve funds." This item includes balances at the Federal Reserve of all depository institutions that are used to satisfy reserve requirements and balances held in excess of balance requirements. It excludes reserves held in the form of cash in bank vaults, and excludes service-related deposits

  • Billions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Currency in circulation includes paper currency and coin held both by the public and in the vaults of depository institutions. The total includes Treasury estimates of coins outstanding and Treasury paper currency outstanding. This definition of currency in circulation differs from the currency component of the money stock, a measure of currency used in some other Federal Reserve reports (for example, the H.6 release), which excludes currency held in vaults of depository institutions. 1984-1985 and Jan 11-Mar 15, 1989: Annual Statistical Digest 1984, 1985, 1989 Table 2. Jan 8, 1986 to date except weeks ending Jan 11, 1989 - Mar 15, 1989: Federal Reserve Board H.4.1.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to primary dealers or foreign central banks under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the dealers' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the dealers.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reserve balances with Federal Reserve Banks are the difference between "total factors supplying reserve funds" and "total factors, other than reserve balances, absorbing reserve funds." This item includes balances at the Federal Reserve of all depository institutions that are used to satisfy reserve requirements and balances held in excess of balance requirements. It excludes reserves held in the form of cash in bank vaults, and excludes service-related deposits.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This account reflects the balances in the accounts that depository institutions have with the Federal Reserve Banks. These balances include reserve balances and service-related balances.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This item reflects the total value of Federal Reserve notes (paper currency) outstanding net of the quantities held by Reserve Banks.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to primary dealers or foreign central banks under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the dealers' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the dealers.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Term deposits are deposits with specified maturity dates that are held by institutions that are eligible to receive interest on their balances at Reserve Banks. Term deposits are separate and distinct from balances maintained in an institution's master account at a Federal Reserve Bank as well as from those maintained in an excess balance account. Term deposits are intended to facilitate the conduct of monetary policy by providing a tool for managing the aggregate quantity of reserve balances.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This item is the sum of "Term deposits held by depository institutions," "Other deposits held by depository institutions," "U.S. Treasury, general account," "U.S. Treasury, supplementary financing account," "foreign official accounts," "service-related deposits," and "other deposits." Term deposits held by depository institutions: Term deposits are deposits with specified maturity dates that are held by institutions that are eligible to receive interest on their balances at Reserve Banks. Term deposits are separate and distinct from balances maintained in an institution's master account at a Federal Reserve Bank as well as from those maintained in an excess balance account. Term deposits are intended to facilitate the conduct of monetary policy by providing a tool for managing the aggregate quantity of reserve balances. Other deposits held by depository institutions: This account reflects the balances in the accounts that depository institutions have with the Federal Reserve Banks. These balances include reserve balances and service-related balances. U.S. Treasury, general account: This account is the primary operational account of the U.S. Treasury at the Federal Reserve. Virtually all U.S. government disbursements are made from this account. Some tax receipts, primarily individual and other tax payments made directly to the Treasury, are deposited in this account, and it is also used to collect funds from sales of Treasury debt. U.S. Treasury, supplementary financing account: With the dramatic expansion of the Federal Reserve's liquidity facilities, the Treasury agreed to establish the Supplementary Financing Program with the Federal Reserve. Under the Supplementary Financing Program, the Treasury issues debt and places the proceeds in the Supplementary Financing Account. The effect of the account is to drain balances from the deposits of depository institutions, helping to offset, somewhat, the rapid rise in balances that resulted from the various Federal Reserve liquidity facilities. Foreign Official: Foreign official deposits are balances of foreign central banks and monetary authorities, foreign governments, and other foreign official institutions with accounts at FRBNY. These balances usually are relatively small because the accounts do not bear interest. While transactions in these accounts are handled by FRBNY for balance sheet purposes, the deposits are allocated across all of the Reserve Banks based on each Reserve Bank's capital and surplus. Other: Other deposits at Federal Reserve Banks include balances of international and multilateral organizations with accounts at FRBNY, such as the International Monetary Fund, United Nations, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank); the special checking account of the ESF (where deposits from monetizing SDRs would be placed); and balances of a few U.S. government agencies, such as the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Other deposits at Federal Reserve Banks include balances of international and multilateral organizations with accounts at FRBNY, such as the International Monetary Fund, United Nations, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank); the special checking account of the ESF (where deposits from monetizing SDRs would be placed); and balances of a few U.S. government agencies, such as the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to a set of counterparties under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements may be conducted with foreign official and international accounts as a service to the holders of these accounts. All other reverse repurchase agreements, including transactions with primary dealers and a set of eligible money market funds, are open market operations intended to manage the supply of reserve balances; reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the counterparties' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the counterparties.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Treasury cash holdings include paper currency and coin held in Treasury vaults, including silver bullion, silver dollars, coinage metal, and unmonetized gold. The value of Treasury cash holdings is estimated using Treasury data.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Currency in circulation includes paper currency and coin held both by the public and in the vaults of depository institutions. The total includes Treasury estimates of coins outstanding and Treasury paper currency outstanding. This definition of currency in circulation differs from the currency component of the money stock, a measure of currency used in some other Federal Reserve reports (for example, the H.6 release), which excludes currency held in vaults of depository institutions.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series is found in Assets and Liabilities of FDIC-Insured Commercial Banks and Savings Institutions. The Quarterly Banking Profile is a quarterly publication that provides the earliest comprehensive summary of financial results for all FDIC-insured institutions. See Notes to Users (https://www.fdic.gov/analysis/quarterly-banking-profile/qbp/timeseries/qbpnot.pdf) for more information.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Total capital is the sum of "capital paid in," "surplus," and "other capital accounts.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to primary dealers or foreign central banks under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. They are typically collateralized using Treasury bills. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the dealers' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the dealers.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Foreign official deposits are balances of foreign central banks and monetary authorities, foreign governments, and other foreign official institutions with accounts at FRBNY. These balances usually are relatively small because the accounts do not bear interest. While transactions in these accounts are handled by FRBNY for balance sheet purposes, the deposits are allocated across all of the Reserve Banks based on each Reserve Bank's capital and surplus.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This item is the sum of "currency in circulation," "reverse repurchase agreements," "Treasury cash holdings," "deposits with Federal Reserve Banks other than reserve balances," and "other liabilities and capital.

  • Billions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Other deposits at Federal Reserve Banks include balances of international and multilateral organizations with accounts at FRBNY, such as the International Monetary Fund, United Nations, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank); the special checking account of the ESF (where deposits from monetizing SDRs would be placed); and balances of a few U.S. government agencies, such as the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Foreign official deposits are balances of foreign central banks and monetary authorities, foreign governments, and other foreign official institutions with accounts at FRBNY. These balances usually are relatively small because the accounts do not bear interest. While transactions in these accounts are handled by FRBNY for balance sheet purposes, the deposits are allocated across all of the Reserve Banks based on each Reserve Bank's capital and surplus.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series is found in Assets and Liabilities of FDIC-Insured Commercial Banks and Savings Institutions. The Quarterly Banking Profile is a quarterly publication that provides the earliest comprehensive summary of financial results for all FDIC-insured institutions. See Notes to Users (https://www.fdic.gov/analysis/quarterly-banking-profile/qbp/timeseries/qbpnot.pdf) for more information.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System make payments for Federal Reserve Bank capital stock. Each member is required by law to become a shareholder and subscribe to shares of its district Reserve Bank in an amount equal to 6 percent of its own paid-in capital and surplus. Of this amount, half must be paid to the Federal Reserve and half remains subject to call by the Board of Governors. When a member's capital or surplus changes, its holdings of Reserve Bank stock must be adjusted accordingly.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Treasury cash holdings include paper currency and coin held in Treasury vaults, including silver bullion, silver dollars, coinage metal, and unmonetized gold. The value of Treasury cash holdings is estimated using Treasury data.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    These accounts used to consist of the unallocated net earnings since the last payment of dividends to stockholders, the amount necessary to equate surplus to paid in capital at year-end, and the accumulated interest to be paid to the Treasury on outstanding Federal Reserve notes. Effective January 1, 2011, the amounts described in the latter sentence will be recorded as a liability, and will be included in Other liabilities and capital accounts on table 1, Other liabilities and accrued dividends on table 9, and Interest on Federal Reserve notes due to U.S. Treasury on table 10.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This item is the sum of "currency in circulation," "reverse repurchase agreements," "Treasury cash holdings," "deposits with Federal Reserve Banks other than reserve balances," and "other liabilities and capital.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This item is the sum of "Term deposits held by depository institutions," "U.S. Treasury, general account," "U.S. Treasury, supplementary financing account," "foreign official accounts," "service-related deposits," and "other deposits.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    After expenses are paid and the statutory cumulative 6 percent dividend on paid-in capital stock is met, Reserve Banks are required by law to pay a part of net earnings into surplus so that surplus equals the amount of capital paid in.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series is found in Assets and Liabilities of FDIC-Insured Commercial Banks and Savings Institutions. The Quarterly Banking Profile is a quarterly publication that provides the earliest comprehensive summary of financial results for all FDIC-insured institutions. See Notes to Users (https://www.fdic.gov/analysis/quarterly-banking-profile/qbp/timeseries/qbpnot.pdf) for more information.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series is found in Assets and Liabilities of FDIC-Insured Commercial Banks and Savings Institutions. The Quarterly Banking Profile is a quarterly publication that provides the earliest comprehensive summary of financial results for all FDIC-insured institutions. See Notes to Users (https://www.fdic.gov/analysis/quarterly-banking-profile/qbp/timeseries/qbpnot.pdf) for more information.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series is found in Assets and Liabilities of FDIC-Insured Commercial Banks and Savings Institutions. The Quarterly Banking Profile is a quarterly publication that provides the earliest comprehensive summary of financial results for all FDIC-insured institutions. See Notes to Users (https://www.fdic.gov/analysis/quarterly-banking-profile/qbp/timeseries/qbpnot.pdf) for more information.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This item is the accrued dividends on Federal Reserve Bank capital stock paid in, accrued between semiannual payment dates (the last business days of June and December). This item also includes the liabilities of the LLCs to entities other than the Federal Reserve that have been consolidated on the Federal Reserve's balance sheet, including liabilities that have recourse only to the portfolio holdings of these LLCs. This item also includes the liability for interest on Federal Reserve notes due to U.S. Treasury. Before the closing of the AIG recapitalization plan on January 14, 2011, included funds from American International Group, Inc. asset dispositions, held as agent.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which securities are sold to primary dealers or foreign central banks under an agreement to buy them back from the same party on a specified date at the same price plus interest. Reverse repurchase agreements absorb reserve balances from the banking system for the length of the agreement. They are typically collateralized using Treasury bills. As with repurchase agreements, the naming convention used here reflects the transaction from the dealers' perspective; the Federal Reserve receives cash in a reverse repurchase agreement and provides collateral to the dealers.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Reserve Banks do not give immediate credit for all checks or other items deposited with them for collection because it can take time to collect payment. Reserve Banks defer credit according to a schedule, which takes into account the time for presentments to be made. The maximum credit deferral is two business days, after which funds are added to the depositing institution's reserve account, regardless of whether the item has been collected from the institution on which it is drawn. The difference between "items in process of collection" and "deferred availability cash items" is "float.

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of U.S. Dollars, Weekly, Not Seasonally Adjusted


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