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  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL413065005.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL413065005&t=) provided by the source.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL073165103.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL073165103&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL893065005.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL893065005&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: LA153165105.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=LA153165105&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL893065105.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL893065105&t=) provided by the source.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL893065405.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL893065405&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Calendar year average. This series was constructed by the Bank of England as part of the Three Centuries of Macroeconomic Data project by combining data from a number of academic and official sources. For more information, please refer to the Three Centuries spreadsheet at https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/statistics/research-datasets. Users are advised to check the underlying assumptions behind this series in the relevant worksheets of the spreadsheet. In many cases alternative assumptions might be appropriate. Users are permitted to reproduce this series in their own work as it represents Bank calculations and manipulations of underlying series that are the copyright of the Bank of England provided that underlying sources are cited appropriately. For appropriate citation please see the Three Centuries spreadsheet for guidance and a list of the underlying sources.

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate

    Source ID: FA673065500.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FA673065500&t=) provided by the source.

  • Index 2010=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    OECD descriptor ID: CPRPTT02 OECD unit ID: IXOB OECD country ID: GBR All OECD data should be cited as follows: OECD, "Main Economic Indicators - complete database", Main Economic Indicators (database),http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/data-00052-en (Accessed on date) Copyright, 2016, OECD. Reprinted with permission.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL893065505.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL893065505&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: LM473063605.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=LM473063605&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    These data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), also known as the household survey. Civilian Labor Force includes all persons in the civilian noninstitutional population ages 16 and older classified as either employed or unemployed. Employed persons are all persons who, during the reference week (the week including the 12th day of the month), (a) did any work as paid employees, worked in their own business or profession or on their own farm, or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers in an enterprise operated by a member of their family, or (b) were not working but who had jobs from which they were temporarily absent because of vacation, illness, bad weather, childcare problems, maternity or paternity leave, labor-management dispute, job training, or other family or personal reasons, whether or not they were paid for the time off or were seeking other jobs. Each employed person is counted only once, even if he or she holds more than one job. Unemployed persons are all persons who had no employment during the reference week, were available for work, except for temporary illness, and had made specific efforts to find employment some time during the 4 week-period ending with the reference week. Persons who were waiting to be recalled to a job from which they had been laid off need not have been looking for work to be classified as unemployed. The unemployment rate is the unemployed percent of the civilian labor force [100 times (unemployed/civilian labor force)]. For more details, see the release's <a href=https://www.bls.gov/lau/laufaq.htm>frequently asked questions</a>.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the US Census Bureau's Annual Services release, online at http://www.census.gov/services/.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL403061913.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL403061913&t=) provided by the source.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FV893065153.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FV893065153&t=) provided by the source.

  • Percent Change at Annual Rate, Annual, Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information, please refer to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System's H.8 release (http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8)

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Source ID: FL673065005.A For more information about the Flow of Funds tables, see the Financial Accounts Guide (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/Default.aspx). With each quarterly release, the source may make major data and structural revisions to the series and tables. These changes are available in the Release Highlights (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/FOFHighlight.aspx). In the Financial Accounts, the source identifies each series by a string of patterned letters and numbers. For a detailed description, including how this series is constructed, see the series analyzer (https://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/fof/SeriesAnalyzer.aspx?s=FL673065005&t=) provided by the source.

  • Years of Age, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Rate per 100,000, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The crude death rate is the number of deaths reported each calendar year divided by the population, multiplied by 100,000. Premature death rate includes all deaths where the deceased is younger than 75 years of age. 75 years of age is the standard consideration of a premature death according to the CDC's definition of Years of Potential Life Loss. Starting with the 2019 vintage, the CDC no longer calculates rates for a county when the death count is less than 20, marking them as "unreliable." FRED records these instances as missing observations in the series. For more information see the Frequently Asked Questions about Death Rates (https://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/help/cmf.html#Frequently%20Asked%20Questions%20about%20Death%20Rates).

  • Rate per 100,000, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Age-adjusted death rates are weighted averages of the age-specific death rates, where the weights represent a fixed population by age. They are used to compare relative mortality risk among groups and over time. An age-adjusted rate represents the rate that would have existed had the age-specific rates of the particular year prevailed in a population whose age distribution was the same as that of the fixed population. Age-adjusted rates should be viewed as relative indexes rather than as direct or actual measures of mortality risk. However, you can select other standard populations, or select specific population criteria to determine the age distribution ratios. Premature death rate includes all deaths where the deceased is younger than 75 years of age. 75 years of age is the standard consideration of a premature death according to the CDC's definition of Years of Potential Life Loss. Starting with the 2019 vintage, the CDC no longer calculates rates for a county when the death count is less than 20, marking them as "unreliable." FRED records these instances as missing observations in the series. For more information see the Frequently Asked Questions about Death Rates (https://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/help/cmf.html#Frequently%20Asked%20Questions%20about%20Death%20Rates).

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Units, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series represents the total number of building permits for all structure types. Structure types include 1-unit, 2-unit, 3-unit, 4-unit, and 5-unit or more.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Burdened households are those households who pay 30 percent or more of their household income on housing (such as rent or mortgage expenses). This is calculated as the sum of households with a mortgage spending 30.0-34.9% of their income on selected monthly owner costs, households with a mortgage spending 35.0% or more of their income on selected monthly owner costs, households without a mortgage spending 30.0-34.9% of their income on selected monthly owner costs, households without a mortgage spending 35.0% or more of their income on selected monthly owner costs, households that rent spending 30.0-34.9% of their income on gross rent, and households that rent spending 35.0% or more of their income on gross rent (ACS 5-year variables DP04_0114E, DP04_0115E, DP04_0123E, DP04_0124E, DP04_0141E, and DP04_0142E respectively from table DP04) divided by the sum of the total number of households with a mortgage, the total number of households without a mortgage, and the total number of households that rent (ACS 5-year variables DP04_0110E, DP04_0117E, and DP04_0136E respectively from table DP04). Note that the calculation excludes households where selected monthly owner costs or gross rent cannot be calculated. Selected monthly owner costs are the sum of payments for mortgages, deeds of trust, contracts to purchase, or similar debts on the property (including payments for the first mortgage, second mortgages, home equity loans, and other junior mortgages); real estate taxes; fire, hazard, and flood insurance on the property; utilities (electricity, gas, and water and sewer); and fuels (oil, coal, kerosene, wood, etc.). It also includes, where appropriate, the monthly condominium fee for condominiums and mobile home costs (installment loan payments, personal property taxes, site rent, registration fees, and license fees). Gross rent provides information on the monthly housing cost expenses for renters. Gross rent is the contract rent plus the estimated average monthly cost of utilities (electricity, gas, and water and sewer) and fuels (oil, coal, kerosene, wood, etc.) if these are paid by the renter (or paid for the renter by someone else). Gross rent is intended to eliminate differentials that result from varying practices with respect to the inclusion of utilities and fuels as part of the rental payment. The estimated costs of water and sewer, and fuels are reported on a 12-month basis but are converted to monthly figures for the tabulations. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Estimate of educational attainment for population 18 years old and over whose highest degree was a bachelor’s, master’s, or professional or doctorate degree. (ACS variable S1501_C02_015E from table S1501.) For more information about the subject definitions, see: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/technical-documentation/code-lists.html. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimates include data collected over a 60-month period. The date associated with the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, the value does not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some additional considerations. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see the ACS handbook (Section 3, "Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates," p. 13) for a comprehensive set of details and clarifications: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf

  • Minutes, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Mean commuting time is calculated by dividing the aggregate travel time to work for all workers (in minutes) by the total number of workers, 16-years old and older, who commute (ACS 5-year variables B08013_001E from table B08013 and B08012_001E from table B08012, respectively). Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010–2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011–2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Disconnected Youth represents the percentage of youth in a county who are between the ages of 16 and 19, who are not enrolled in school and who are unemployed or not in the labor force. (ACS 5 year variables from table DP02) Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook for a more thorough clarification. https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf The data is determined from the following calculation: (B14005_010E + B14005_011E + B14005_014E + B14005_015E + B14005_024E + B14005_025E + B14005_028E + B14005_029E) / B14005_001E

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Index 2000=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    As stated by the source, these annual county indexes should be considered developmental. As with the standard FHFA HPIs, revisions to these indexes may reflect the impact of new data or technical adjustments. Indexes are calibrated using appraisal values and sales prices for mortgages bought or guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. As discussed in the Working Paper 16-01, in cases where sample sizes are small for the county area, an index is either not reported if recording has not started or a missing value is reported with a period (.). Index values always reflect the native county index, i.e. they are not made with data from another area or year. For tracking and feedback purposes, please cite Working Paper 16-01 when using these data. A suggested form is: Bogin, A., Doerner, W. and Larson, W. (2016). Local House Price Dynamics: New Indices and Stylized Facts. Federal Housing Finance Agency, Working Paper 16-01. The working paper is accessible at http://www.fhfa.gov/papers/wp1601.aspx.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data obtained from ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates, table DP05. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Racial Dissimilarity Index measures the percentage of the non-hispanic white population in a county which would have to change Census tracts to equalize the racial distribution between white and non-white population groups across all tracts in the county. Starting with the 2016 observations, the calculation has been changed so that counties with only one census tract have missing data. Zero values represent counties where the proportions of non-white population and non-hispanic white population are the same. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010–2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011–2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Estimate of educational attainment for population 18 years old and over using 5 years of data. The percent of the population who is a High School Graduate or Higher includes people whose highest degree was a high school diploma or its equivalent, people who attended college but did not receive a degree, and people who received an associate's, bachelor's, master's, or professional or doctorate degree. People who reported completing 12th grade but not receiving a diploma are not included. (ACS variable S1501_C02_014E from table S1501.) For more information about the subject definitions, see: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/technical-documentation/code-lists.html. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimates include data collected over a 60-month period. The date associated with the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, the value does not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some additional considerations. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see the ACS handbook (Section 3, "Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates," p. 13) for a comprehensive set of details and clarifications: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The American Community Survey (ACS) and the Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS) ask respondents age 1 year and over whether they lived in the same residence 1 year ago. For people who lived in a different residence, the location of their previous residence is collected. ACS uses a series of monthly samples to produce estimates. The 5-year dataset is used for the county-to-county migration flows since many counties have a population less than 20,000. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The single-parent household rate is calculated as the sum of male and female single-parent households with their own children who are younger than 18-years of age divided by total households with their own children who are younger than 18-years of age (ACS 5-year variables S1101_C03_005E, S1101_C04_005E, and S1101_C01_005E respectively from table S1101). Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The percentage of population below the poverty level comes from American Community Survey (ACS) variable S1701_C03_001E in table S1701. Multiyear estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS 5-year estimate includes data collected over a 60-month period. The date of the data is the end of the 5-year period. For example, a value dated 2014 represents data from 2010 to 2014. However, they do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. Multiyear estimates require some considerations that single-year estimates do not. For example, multiyear estimates released in consecutive years consist mostly of overlapping years and shared data. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates share sample data from 2011 through 2014 with the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year estimates. Because of this overlap, users should use extreme caution in making comparisons with consecutive years of multiyear estimates. Please see "Section 3: Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" on publication page 13 (file page 19) of the 2018 ACS General Handbook (https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf) for a more thorough clarification.

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data for "Resident Population" are estimates as of July 1. Data for 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000 are annual census. Population estimates are updated annually using current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. Each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census.

  • Thousands of Chained 2012 U.S. Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    GDP by county is a measure of the market value of final goods and services produced within a county area in a particular period. While other measures of county economies rely mainly on labor market data, these statistics incorporate multiple data sources that capture trends in labor, revenue, and value of production. As a result, the capital-intensive industries are captured more fully than when measured solely by labor data.

  • Thousands of U.S. Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    GDP by county is a measure of the market value of final goods and services produced within a county area in a particular period. While other measures of county economies rely mainly on labor market data, these statistics incorporate multiple data sources that capture trends in labor, revenue, and value of production. As a result, the capital-intensive industries are captured more fully than when measured solely by labor data.

  • Thousands of Chained 2012 U.S. Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    GDP by county is a measure of the market value of final goods and services produced within a county area in a particular period. While other measures of county economies rely mainly on labor market data, these statistics incorporate multiple data sources that capture trends in labor, revenue, and value of production. As a result, the capital-intensive industries are captured more fully than when measured solely by labor data.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For further information about this series go to https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/saipe/about.html.


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