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  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information about this release go to http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/gdp_state/qgsp_newsrelease.htm.

  • Dollars per Hour, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, visit https://www.dol.gov/whd/state/stateMinWageHis.htm

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Data for "Resident Population" from 1900 to present are estimates as of July 1

  • Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Millions of Chained 2012 Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • 2018 CPI-U-RS Adjusted Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Household data are collected as of March. Consumer Price Index research series using current methods (CPI-U-RS) presents an estimate of the CPI for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) that incorporates most of the improvements made over that time span into the entire series. More information can be found at https://www.bls.gov/cpi/research-series/home.htm. As stated in the Census's "Source and Accuracy of Estimates for Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011" (http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/p60_243sa.pdf): Estimation of Median Incomes. The Census Bureau has changed the methodology for computing median income over time. The Census Bureau has computed medians using either Pareto interpolation or linear interpolation. Currently, we are using linear interpolation to estimate all medians. Pareto interpolation assumes a decreasing density of population within an income interval, whereas linear interpolation assumes a constant density of population within an income interval. The Census Bureau calculated estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1979 through 1987 using Pareto interpolation if the estimate was larger than $20,000 for people or $40,000 for families and households. This is because the width of the income interval containing the estimate is greater than $2,500. We calculated estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1976, 1977, and 1978 using Pareto interpolation if the estimate was larger than $12,000 for people or $18,000 for families and households. This is because the width of the income interval containing the estimate is greater than $1,000. All other estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1976 through 2011 (2012 ASEC) and almost all of the estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1975 and earlier were calculated using linear interpolation. Thus, use caution when comparing median incomes above $12,000 for people or $18,000 for families and households for different years. Median incomes below those levels are more comparable from year to year since they have always been calculated using linear interpolation. For an indication of the comparability of medians calculated using Pareto interpolation with medians calculated using linear interpolation, see Series P-60, Number 114, Money Income in 1976 of Families and Persons in the United States (www2.census.gov/prod2/popscan/p60-114.pdf).

  • Current Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Household data are collected as of March. As stated in the Census's "Source and Accuracy of Estimates for Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011" (http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/p60_243sa.pdf): Estimation of Median Incomes. The Census Bureau has changed the methodology for computing median income over time. The Census Bureau has computed medians using either Pareto interpolation or linear interpolation. Currently, we are using linear interpolation to estimate all medians. Pareto interpolation assumes a decreasing density of population within an income interval, whereas linear interpolation assumes a constant density of population within an income interval. The Census Bureau calculated estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1979 through 1987 using Pareto interpolation if the estimate was larger than $20,000 for people or $40,000 for families and households. This is because the width of the income interval containing the estimate is greater than $2,500. We calculated estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1976, 1977, and 1978 using Pareto interpolation if the estimate was larger than $12,000 for people or $18,000 for families and households. This is because the width of the income interval containing the estimate is greater than $1,000. All other estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1976 through 2011 (2012 ASEC) and almost all of the estimates of median income and associated standard errors for 1975 and earlier were calculated using linear interpolation. Thus, use caution when comparing median incomes above $12,000 for people or $18,000 for families and households for different years. Median incomes below those levels are more comparable from year to year since they have always been calculated using linear interpolation. For an indication of the comparability of medians calculated using Pareto interpolation with medians calculated using linear interpolation, see Series P-60, Number 114, Money Income in 1976 of Families and Persons in the United States (www2.census.gov/prod2/popscan/p60-114.pdf).

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Estimate of educational attainment for population 18 years old and over whose highest degree was a high school diploma or its equivalent, people who attended college but did not receive a degree, and people who received an associate's, bachelor's, master's, or professional or doctorate degree. People who reported completing the 12th grade but not receiving a diploma are not included (ACS variable S1501_C02_014E from table S1501.) For more information about the subject definitions, see: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/technical-documentation/code-lists.html. Single-year estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS single-year estimates include data collected over a 12-month period; explicitly the calendar year (e.g., the 2015 ACS covers the period from January 2015 through December 2015). Please see the ACS handbook (Section 3, "Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" p. 13) for a comprehensive set of details and clarifications: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf"

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Estimate of educational attainment for population 18 years old and over whose highest degree was a bachelor's, master's, or professional or doctorate degree. (ACS variable S1501_C02_015E from table S1501.) For more information about the subject definitions, see: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/technical-documentation/code-lists.html. Single-year estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) are "period" estimates derived from a data sample collected over a period of time, as opposed to "point-in-time" estimates such as those from past decennial censuses. ACS single-year estimates include data collected over a 12-month period; explicitly the calendar year (e.g., the 2015 ACS covers the period from January 2015 through December 2015). Please see the ACS handbook (Section 3, "Understanding and Using ACS Single-Year and Multiyear Estimates" p. 13) for a comprehensive set of details and clarifications: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/acs/acs_general_handbook_2018.pdf"

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Million Metric Tons CO2, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    See the EIA's report on Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by State (http://www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/state/analysis/) for technical notes and documentation.

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The U.S. Census Bureau provides annual estimates of income and poverty statistics for all school districts, counties, and states through the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/saipe/about.html) (SAIPE) program. The bureau's main objective with this program is to provide estimates of income and poverty for the administration of federal programs and the allocation of federal funds to local jurisdictions. In addition to these federal programs, state and local programs use the income and poverty estimates for distributing funds and managing programs. SNAP benefits are one of the data sources used in producing SAIPE program estimates. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the name for what was formerly known as the federal Food Stamp Program, as of October 1, 2008. The SNAP benefits data represent the number of participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for each county, state, and the District of Columbia from 1981 to the latest available year. See more details about SAIPE Model Input Data (https://www.census.gov/data/datasets/time-series/demo/saipe/model-tables.html).

  • Millions of Chained 2012 Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information about this release go to http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/gdp_state/qgsp_newsrelease.htm.

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Thousands of Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Percent, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Number, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series may have irregularities or important features that are not disclosed here. To see whether this is the case, please consult Part 1, Section 1, Table 8 in the original source at https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/scribd/?item_id=6408&filepath=%2Fdocs%2Fpublications%2Fbms%2F1914-1941%2FBMS14-41_complete.pdf&start_page=1 Relevant details can be found in the footnotes of each table as well as the introductory material for Section 1.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series may have irregularities or important features that are not disclosed here. To see whether this is the case, please consult Part 1, Section 1, Table 8 in the original source at https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/scribd/?item_id=6408&filepath=%2Fdocs%2Fpublications%2Fbms%2F1914-1941%2FBMS14-41_complete.pdf&start_page=1 Relevant details can be found in the footnotes of each table as well as the introductory material for Section 1.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Index, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Regional price parities (RPPs) are regional price levels expressed as a percentage of the overall national price level for a given year. The price levels are determined by the average prices paid by consumers for the mix of goods and services consumed in each region. Taking the ratio of RPPs shows the difference in price levels across regions. Rents RPPs are estimated only for observed tenants' rents and do not include imputed owner-occupied rent values. For more information about this release go to http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/rpp/rpp_newsrelease.htm or http://www.bea.gov/regional/methods.cfm.

  • US PCE Index 2012=100, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The Implicit Regional Price Deflator (IRPD) is the ratio of the current-dollar value of a series, such as regional personal income, to its corresponding chained-dollar value, multiplied by 100. For more information about this release go to http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/rpp/rpp_newsrelease.htm or http://www.bea.gov/regional/methods.cfm.

  • Index, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Regional price parities (RPPs) are regional price levels expressed as a percentage of the overall national price level for a given year. The price levels are determined by the average prices paid by consumers for the mix of goods and services consumed in each region. Taking the ratio of RPPs shows the difference in price levels across regions. Goods refer to durable and nondurable consumption goods used in the estimation of the RPPs. Goods categories include apparel, education, food, housing, medical, recreation, transportation, and other goods. For more information about this release go to http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/rpp/rpp_newsrelease.htm or http://www.bea.gov/regional/methods.cfm.

  • Index, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    Regional price parities (RPPs) are regional price levels expressed as a percentage of the overall national price level for a given year. The price levels are determined by the average prices paid by consumers for the mix of goods and services consumed in each region. Taking the ratio of RPPs shows the difference in price levels across regions. Other services refer to services consumption products, except rents, that are used in the estimation of the RPPs. Other services categories include education, food, housing, medical, recreation, transportation, and other services. For more information about this release go to http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/rpp/rpp_newsrelease.htm or http://www.bea.gov/regional/methods.cfm.

  • Persons, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    The U.S. Census Bureau provides annual estimates of income and poverty statistics for all school districts, counties, and states through the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/saipe/about.html) (SAIPE) program. The bureau's main objective with this program is to provide estimates of income and poverty for the administration of federal programs and the allocation of federal funds to local jurisdictions. In addition to these federal programs, state and local programs use the income and poverty estimates for distributing funds and managing programs. Poverty universe is one of the data sources used in producing SAIPE program estimates, it is made up of persons for whom the Census Bureau can determine poverty status (either "in poverty" or "not in poverty"). The definition of poverty universe for SAIPE estimates is the same for 2006 and beyond and conceptually matches the poverty universe of the American Community Survey (ACS). The poverty universe estimates are not the same as the population estimates from the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program. Instead, they are derived estimates that differ from population estimates in the following ways: 1. The poverty universe does not include children under the age of 15 who are not related to a reference person within the household by way of birth, marriage or adoption (for example, foster children). The reason is that Census Bureau surveys typically ask income questions only of persons age 15 or older and those under 15 related to a reference person within the household. 2. Beginning with 2006, the poverty universe includes group quarters populations only for noninstitutionalized group quarters, not elsewhere classified. Residents of college dormitories, military housing, and all institutional group quarters populations are excluded. The 2005 poverty universe estimates excluded all group quarters' residents, matching the definition of the 2005 ACS. Prior to the estimates for 2005, the poverty universe data were derived from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the Current Population Survey. This marks a break in the data series due to a methodology change. See more details about SAIPE Model Input Data (https://www.census.gov/data/datasets/time-series/demo/saipe/model-tables.html).

  • Millions of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    This series may have irregularities or important features that are not disclosed here. To see whether this is the case, please consult Part 1, Section 1, Table 8 in the original source at https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/scribd/?item_id=6408&filepath=%2Fdocs%2Fpublications%2Fbms%2F1914-1941%2FBMS14-41_complete.pdf&start_page=1 Relevant details can be found in the footnotes of each table as well as the introductory material for Section 1.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.

  • Thousands of Dollars, Annual, Not Seasonally Adjusted

    For more information, see https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/qtax.html.


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