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NOTES

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Gross Domestic Product  

Units:  Billions of Dollars, Not Seasonally Adjusted

Frequency:  Annual

Notes:

BEA Account Code: A261RC

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Gross Domestic Income [GDIA], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/GDIA, February 24, 2020.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Fixed Assets  

Units:  Billions of Dollars, Not Seasonally Adjusted

Frequency:  Annual

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Current-Cost Depreciation of Fixed Assets [M1TTOTL1ES000], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/M1TTOTL1ES000, February 24, 2020.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics  

Release: Weekly and Hourly Earnings from the Current Population Survey  

Units:  Dollars, Not Seasonally Adjusted

Frequency:  Annual

Notes:

Data measure usual weekly earnings of wage and salary workers. Wage and salary workers are workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors but, for the purposes of the earnings series, it excludes all self-employed persons, both those with incorporated businesses and those with unincorporated businesses.
Usual weekly earnings represent earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Prior to 1994, respondents were asked how much they usually earned per week. Since January 1994, respondents have been asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term "usual" is determined by each respondent's own understanding of the term. If the respondent asks for a definition of "usual," interviewers are instructed to define the term as more than half the weeks worked during the past 4 or 5 months. For more information see https://www.bls.gov/cps/earnings.htm

The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)'

The source code is: LEU0252881500

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employed full time: Median usual weekly nominal earnings (second quartile): Wage and salary workers: 16 years and over [LEU0252881500A], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/LEU0252881500A, February 24, 2020.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics  

Release: Employment Situation  

Units:  Thousands of Persons, Seasonally Adjusted

Frequency:  Monthly

Notes:

All Employees: Total Nonfarm, commonly known as Total Nonfarm Payroll, is a measure of the number of U.S. workers in the economy that excludes proprietors, private household employees, unpaid volunteers, farm employees, and the unincorporated self-employed. This measure accounts for approximately 80 percent of the workers who contribute to Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

This measure provides useful insights into the current economic situation because it can represent the number of jobs added or lost in an economy. Increases in employment might indicate that businesses are hiring which might also suggest that businesses are growing. Additionally, those who are newly employed have increased their personal incomes, which means (all else constant) their disposable incomes have also increased, thus fostering further economic expansion.

Generally, the U.S. labor force and levels of employment and unemployment are subject to fluctuations due to seasonal changes in weather, major holidays, and the opening and closing of schools. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) adjusts the data to offset the seasonal effects to show non-seasonal changes: for example, women's participation in the labor force; or a general decline in the number of employees, a possible indication of a downturn in the economy. To closely examine seasonal and non-seasonal changes, the BLS releases two monthly statistical measures: the seasonally adjusted All Employees: Total Nonfarm (PAYEMS) and All Employees: Total Nonfarm (PAYNSA), which is not seasonally adjusted.

The series comes from the 'Current Employment Statistics (Establishment Survey).'

The source code is: CES0000000001

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, All Employees, Total Nonfarm [PAYEMS], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/PAYEMS, February 24, 2020.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Gross Domestic Product  

Units:  Percent, Not Seasonally Adjusted

Frequency:  Annual

Notes:

BEA Account Code: W270RE

For more information about this series, please see http://www.bea.gov/national/.

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Shares of gross domestic income: Compensation of employees, paid: Wage and salary accruals: Disbursements: to persons [W270RE1A156NBEA], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/W270RE1A156NBEA, February 24, 2020.

RELATED CONTENT

Related Resources

Other Formats

Gross Domestic Income

Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate Millions of Dollars, Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

Employed full time: Median usual weekly nominal earnings (second quartile): Wage and salary workers: 16 years and over

Quarterly, Not Seasonally Adjusted Quarterly, Seasonally Adjusted

All Employees, Total Nonfarm

Monthly, Not Seasonally Adjusted

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