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  EDIT LINE 1
(a) Nonfarm Business Sector: Labor Share, Index 2009=100, Seasonally Adjusted (PRS85006173)

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(a) Capacity Utilization: Total Industry, Percent of Capacity, Seasonally Adjusted (TCU)
Capacity Utilization: Total Industry (TCU) is the percentage of resources used by corporations and factories to produce goods in manufacturing, mining, and electric and gas utilities for all facilities located in the United States (excluding those in U.S. territories).(1) We can also think of capacity utilization as how much capacity is being used from the total available capacity to produce demanded finished products.

Capacity utilization indexes are constructed for 71 industries in manufacturing, 16 in mining, and 2 in utilities. (1) Physical data on capacity utilization are primarily compiled from trade sources and government sources, such as the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Energy Information Administration.(1) When physical data are unavailable, capacity utilization data are compiled from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Quarterly Survey of Plant Capacity Utilization, which provides data for almost 70 percent of total industry capacity.(1) Additionally, the capacity index is developed on a monthly basis, designed to be consistent with the production index.(1)
According to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the capacity index tries to conceptualize the idea of sustainable maximum output, which is defined as the highest level of output a plant can sustain within the confines of its resources. The Board of Governors defines the seasonally adjusted capacity utilization rate as the output index divided by the capacity index. The capacity utilization rate can also implicitly describe how efficiently the factors of production (inputs in the production process) are being used. (1) It sheds light on how much more firms can produce without additional costs. Additionally, this rate gives manufacturers some idea as to how much consumer demand they will be able to meet in the future.
The Federal Reserve strives to construct a capacity index consistent with time by using different relevant data sources.(1) Developing an index that is reasonable given the time period is the primary aim for this index, but there are still some difficulties. Extensive technological and structural changes have and will continue to occur, affecting the degree of tightness the Federal Reserve index of capacity utilization will represent.(2) In addition, each series of capacity utilization is flawed by commission; therefore, they should be used with caution.(2)
References
(1) Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. “Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization.” Statistical release G.17;. May 15, 2013.
(2) Bauer, Paul W. and Deily, Mary E. “A User’s Guide to Capacity- Utilization Measures.” Economic Commentary. Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, July 1, 1988; https://www.clevelandfed.org/newsroom-and-events/publications/economic-commentary/economic-commentary-archives/1988-economic-commentaries/ec-19880701-a-users-guide-to-capacity-utilization-measures.aspx.

Capacity Utilization: Total Industry

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(a) Civilian Unemployment Rate, Percent, Seasonally Adjusted (UNRATE)
The unemployment rate represents the number of unemployed as a percentage of the labor force. Labor force data are restricted to people 16 years of age and older, who currently reside in 1 of the 50 states or the District of Columbia, who do not reside in institutions (e.g., penal and mental facilities, homes for the aged), and who are not on active duty in the Armed Forces.

This rate is also defined as the U-3 measure of labor underutilization.

The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)'

The source code is: LNS14000000

Civilian Unemployment Rate

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  EDIT LINE 4
(a) Real Gross Domestic Product, Billions of Chained 2009 Dollars, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate (GDPC1)
BEA Account Code: A191RX1

Real gross domestic product is the inflation adjusted value of the goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States.

For more information see the Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Real Gross Domestic Product

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(a) Personal Consumption Expenditures, Billions of Dollars, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate (PCEC)
BEA Account Code: DPCERC1

A Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Personal Consumption Expenditures

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  EDIT LINE 6
(a) Corporate Profits After Tax with Inventory Valuation Adjustment (IVA) and Capital Consumption Adjustment (CCAdj), Billions of Dollars, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate (CPATAX)
BEA Account Code: A551RC1

A Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Corporate Profits After Tax with Inventory Valuation Adjustment (IVA) and Capital Consumption Adjustment (CCAdj)

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(b) Gross Domestic Product, Billions of Dollars, Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate (GDP)

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  EDIT LINE 7
(a) Effective Federal Funds Rate, Percent, Not Seasonally Adjusted (FEDFUNDS)
Averages of daily figures.

The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions trade federal funds (balances held at Federal Reserve Banks) with each other overnight. When a depository institution has surplus balances in its reserve account, it lends to other banks in need of larger balances. In simpler terms, a bank with excess cash, which is often referred to as liquidity, will lend to another bank that needs to quickly raise liquidity. (1) The rate that the borrowing institution pays to the lending institution is determined between the two banks; the weighted average rate for all of these types of negotiations is called the effective federal funds rate.(2) The effective federal funds rate is essentially determined by the market but is influenced by the Federal Reserve through open market operations to reach the federal funds rate target.(2)
The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meets eight times a year to determine the federal funds target rate. As previously stated, this rate influences the effective federal funds rate through open market operations or by buying and selling of government bonds (government debt).(2) More specifically, the Federal Reserve decreases liquidity by selling government bonds, thereby raising the federal funds rate because banks have less liquidity to trade with other banks. Similarly, the Federal Reserve can increase liquidity by buying government bonds, decreasing the federal funds rate because banks have excess liquidity for trade. Whether the Federal Reserve wants to buy or sell bonds depends on the state of the economy. If the FOMC believes the economy is growing too fast and inflation pressures are inconsistent with the dual mandate of the Federal Reserve, the Committee may set a higher federal funds rate target to temper economic activity. In the opposing scenario, the FOMC may set a lower federal funds rate target to spur greater economic activity. Therefore, the FOMC must observe the current state of the economy to determine the best course of monetary policy that will maximize economic growth while adhering to the dual mandate set forth by Congress. In making its monetary policy decisions, the FOMC considers a wealth of economic data, such as: trends in prices and wages, employment, consumer spending and income, business investments, and foreign exchange markets.
The federal funds rate is the central interest rate in the U.S. financial market. It influences other interest rates such as the prime rate, which is the rate banks charge their customers with higher credit ratings. Additionally, the federal funds rate indirectly influences longer- term interest rates such as mortgages, loans, and savings, all of which are very important to consumer wealth and confidence.(2)
References
(1) Federal Reserve Bank of New York. “Federal funds.” Fedpoints, August 2007.
(2) Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. “Monetary Policy”. http://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/default.htm.

Effective Federal Funds Rate

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Select a date that will equal 100 for your custom index:

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NOTES

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics  

Release: Productivity and Costs  

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Nonfarm Business Sector: Labor Share [PRS85006173], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/PRS85006173, March 26, 2017.

Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US)  

Release: G.17 Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization  

Notes:

Capacity Utilization: Total Industry (TCU) is the percentage of resources used by corporations and factories to produce goods in manufacturing, mining, and electric and gas utilities for all facilities located in the United States (excluding those in U.S. territories).(1) We can also think of capacity utilization as how much capacity is being used from the total available capacity to produce demanded finished products.

Capacity utilization indexes are constructed for 71 industries in manufacturing, 16 in mining, and 2 in utilities. (1) Physical data on capacity utilization are primarily compiled from trade sources and government sources, such as the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Energy Information Administration.(1) When physical data are unavailable, capacity utilization data are compiled from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Quarterly Survey of Plant Capacity Utilization, which provides data for almost 70 percent of total industry capacity.(1) Additionally, the capacity index is developed on a monthly basis, designed to be consistent with the production index.(1)
According to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the capacity index tries to conceptualize the idea of sustainable maximum output, which is defined as the highest level of output a plant can sustain within the confines of its resources. The Board of Governors defines the seasonally adjusted capacity utilization rate as the output index divided by the capacity index. The capacity utilization rate can also implicitly describe how efficiently the factors of production (inputs in the production process) are being used. (1) It sheds light on how much more firms can produce without additional costs. Additionally, this rate gives manufacturers some idea as to how much consumer demand they will be able to meet in the future.
The Federal Reserve strives to construct a capacity index consistent with time by using different relevant data sources.(1) Developing an index that is reasonable given the time period is the primary aim for this index, but there are still some difficulties. Extensive technological and structural changes have and will continue to occur, affecting the degree of tightness the Federal Reserve index of capacity utilization will represent.(2) In addition, each series of capacity utilization is flawed by commission; therefore, they should be used with caution.(2)
References
(1) Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. “Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization.” Statistical release G.17;. May 15, 2013.
(2) Bauer, Paul W. and Deily, Mary E. “A User’s Guide to Capacity- Utilization Measures.” Economic Commentary. Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, July 1, 1988; https://www.clevelandfed.org/newsroom-and-events/publications/economic-commentary/economic-commentary-archives/1988-economic-commentaries/ec-19880701-a-users-guide-to-capacity-utilization-measures.aspx.

Suggested Citation:

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Capacity Utilization: Total Industry [TCU], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TCU, March 26, 2017.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics  

Release: Employment Situation  

Notes:

The unemployment rate represents the number of unemployed as a percentage of the labor force. Labor force data are restricted to people 16 years of age and older, who currently reside in 1 of the 50 states or the District of Columbia, who do not reside in institutions (e.g., penal and mental facilities, homes for the aged), and who are not on active duty in the Armed Forces.

This rate is also defined as the U-3 measure of labor underutilization.

The series comes from the 'Current Population Survey (Household Survey)'

The source code is: LNS14000000

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Civilian Unemployment Rate [UNRATE], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/UNRATE, March 26, 2017.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Gross Domestic Product  

Notes:

BEA Account Code: A191RX1

Real gross domestic product is the inflation adjusted value of the goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States.

For more information see the Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Real Gross Domestic Product [GDPC1], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/GDPC1, March 26, 2017.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Gross Domestic Product  

Notes:

BEA Account Code: DPCERC1

A Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Personal Consumption Expenditures [PCEC], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/PCEC, March 26, 2017.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Gross Domestic Product  

Notes:

BEA Account Code: A551RC1

A Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Corporate Profits After Tax with Inventory Valuation Adjustment (IVA) and Capital Consumption Adjustment (CCAdj) [CPATAX], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/CPATAX, March 26, 2017.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis  

Release: Gross Domestic Product  

Notes:

BEA Account Code: A191RC1

Gross domestic product (GDP), the featured measure of U.S. output, is the market value of the goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States.

For more information, see the Guide to the National Income and Product Accounts of the United States (NIPA) - (http://www.bea.gov/national/pdf/nipaguid.pdf)

Suggested Citation:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Gross Domestic Product [GDP], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/GDP, March 26, 2017.

Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US)  

Release: H.15 Selected Interest Rates  

Notes:

Averages of daily figures.

The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions trade federal funds (balances held at Federal Reserve Banks) with each other overnight. When a depository institution has surplus balances in its reserve account, it lends to other banks in need of larger balances. In simpler terms, a bank with excess cash, which is often referred to as liquidity, will lend to another bank that needs to quickly raise liquidity. (1) The rate that the borrowing institution pays to the lending institution is determined between the two banks; the weighted average rate for all of these types of negotiations is called the effective federal funds rate.(2) The effective federal funds rate is essentially determined by the market but is influenced by the Federal Reserve through open market operations to reach the federal funds rate target.(2)
The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meets eight times a year to determine the federal funds target rate. As previously stated, this rate influences the effective federal funds rate through open market operations or by buying and selling of government bonds (government debt).(2) More specifically, the Federal Reserve decreases liquidity by selling government bonds, thereby raising the federal funds rate because banks have less liquidity to trade with other banks. Similarly, the Federal Reserve can increase liquidity by buying government bonds, decreasing the federal funds rate because banks have excess liquidity for trade. Whether the Federal Reserve wants to buy or sell bonds depends on the state of the economy. If the FOMC believes the economy is growing too fast and inflation pressures are inconsistent with the dual mandate of the Federal Reserve, the Committee may set a higher federal funds rate target to temper economic activity. In the opposing scenario, the FOMC may set a lower federal funds rate target to spur greater economic activity. Therefore, the FOMC must observe the current state of the economy to determine the best course of monetary policy that will maximize economic growth while adhering to the dual mandate set forth by Congress. In making its monetary policy decisions, the FOMC considers a wealth of economic data, such as: trends in prices and wages, employment, consumer spending and income, business investments, and foreign exchange markets.
The federal funds rate is the central interest rate in the U.S. financial market. It influences other interest rates such as the prime rate, which is the rate banks charge their customers with higher credit ratings. Additionally, the federal funds rate indirectly influences longer- term interest rates such as mortgages, loans, and savings, all of which are very important to consumer wealth and confidence.(2)
References
(1) Federal Reserve Bank of New York. “Federal funds.” Fedpoints, August 2007.
(2) Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. “Monetary Policy”. http://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/default.htm.

Suggested Citation:

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Effective Federal Funds Rate [FEDFUNDS], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/FEDFUNDS, March 26, 2017.

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Employment Situation

G.17 Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization

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H.15 Selected Interest Rates






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